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Environment UK

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Sun05282017

Last update09:19:28 AM GMT

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How we must safeguard our future

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Facing critical challenges to all of humanity, our only option is to move towards greater awareness and understanding of why and how we must act to safeguard our common future and to protect planet earth.

20 years ago, the international commission which the United Nations had asked me to establish and chair laid before the world its findings based on years of hard work, of learning and of sharing experience.

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LPG: so much more than just a car fuel

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With the headlong rush to find renewable and zero-carbon energy solutions there is a danger that the role that lower carbon fossil fuels can play in offering a viable platform in the short to medium term will be overlooked.

However, existing technologies and the availability of certain fuels mean that carbon reduction can start to be achieved at marketplace prices.

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Micro-renewables: a guide

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A study conducted recently by Manchester University on Barratt Developments’ Eco Village in Chorley serves to emphasise that there’s no ‘one size fits all’ solution to the Merton Rule’s requirement that all new developments generate 10% from on-site renewables.

So how do the technologies compare? And how do you choose the best solution for a specific project?

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Save water, money and the environment

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Rainwater collection and distribution systems can be installed in both new and existing buildings and the alternative water supply can be used for essentially all purposes except direct potable use. Buildings with large roof areas are ideal for rainwater collection, particularly where a constant use can be found for the recovered water, such as cleaning processes, to flush toilets or for irrigation.

Water is becoming more expensive and only a small proportion is used for direct potable use. Using rainwater appropriately can save up to 75% on potable water bills.

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How to minimise the crushing cost of glass recycling

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Glass is the ideal material for recycling, and where it is used for new glass container manufacture it is infinitely recyclable. The use of recycled glass in new containers conserves raw materials, reduces energy consumption and reduces the volume of waste sent to landfill.

Around 750,000 tonnes of glass bottles are thrown out every year in the UK from hotels, pubs, restaurants and cafes, with up to 75% being sent to landfill sites. The UK has a current municipal recycling rate of 34% for container glass. This is poor when you consider that some European countries recycle more than 90% of their container waste and recycling figures of more than 50% are the norm.

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